Why Could My License Be Suspended in Michigan?

As highly trusted Michigan driver's license restoration attorneys, we know there are many reasons an individual's license may be suspended in addition to the obvious reasons such as DUI and speeding. Many people are not aware of other reasons their driving privilege may be suspended or revoked. In every state, driving is a privilege and not a right. When you violate traffic laws, your license may be suspended for a period of time, or even indefinitely in some situations. At Grabel & Associates, our driver’s license attorney’s goal is to instruct motorists in Michigan about the various reasons for driver's license suspension.

A common question Michigan motorists have is why their driver's license may be suspended. Below are many of the reasons for license suspension, as listed on the DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) website at DMV.com.

DUI, or driving under the influence: Anyone found guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs will have his or her license suspended for a specific length of time, depending on whether it is a first or subsequent offense.

Driving without auto insurance: In Michigan, all vehicles must be properly insured before operating on the state's roadways. If you cannot provide proof of valid auto insurance, your driver's license may be suspended.

Twelve or more points on your driving record: An excessive number of moving violations may result in your license being suspended. For each moving violation, a certain number of points are assigned to your driving record. When that number reaches 12, your license will be suspended.

Driving violations: Speeding, reckless driving, or causing an accident that results in a fatality and abandoning your vehicle will result in suspension of your Michigan driver's license.

Non-moving violations: Failure to pay child support, failing to pay traffic tickets or respond to citations, not appearing in court or responding to t he Secretary of State in regards to a non-moving violation, and other issues may result in license suspension.

Making a fictitious bomb threat at a school: If you are found guilty of making a false bomb threat at a school, your driver's license will be suspended for one year.

Stealing gasoline: Stealing motor vehicle gas will result in license suspension of 180 days for a first offense. Any subsequent offense will result in a one-year license suspension.

Joyriding: A conviction for a first offense joyriding will result in a 90-day license suspension. If you have been convicted of joyriding within a 7-year time period and are convicted again, your license will be suspended for one year.

Driving with no license or a suspended license: If you are caught driving without your license with you, your driver's license may be suspended. Additionally, driving on a license that has already been suspended will result in an increase in the suspension period. Prison time is also a possibility.

Fake change of address: Giving a fake change of address will result in your license being suspended for 180 days. If you repeat the offense, your license may be suspended for a period of one year.

Mandatory suspensions: Fleeing or evading police, committing a crime using a vehicle, changing/falsifying vehicle documents, reckless driving, leaving the scene of an accident where someone was injured without giving reasonable aid, and unlawful use of an ID (fake ID) if younger than 21 are some examples of circumstances which may result in license suspension.

As you can see, there are many reasons someone's driver's license may be suspended. From traffic violations and accumulated points to DUI, unpaid child support, and falsification of documents or no vehicle insurance, having your license suspended can dramatically change your life, creating many hardships.

At Grabel & Associates, our Michigan driver's license restoration attorneys are highly skilled and knowledgeable in the area of license suspension and revocation. If your driver's license has been suspended, contact us now at 1-800-677-9795 to learn whether it may be possible to regain your driving privilege.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.