Fleeing & Eluding a Police Officer in Michigan


Essentially, an individual who commits the felony criminal offense of fleeing & eluding willfully or purposefully fails to obey when a police officer commands the individual to stop or signals the driver in some lawful way which is ignored. However, it is important to note that for the driver to be required to pull over or stop, the officer must be driving an identifiable police or DNR vehicle, and wearing a police uniform. If you have been accused of fleeing and eluding a police officer in Michigan, contact a qualified Michigan driver's license lawyer at once.

When someone increases the speed of a vehicle, turns off the headlights, or attempts in some other manner to flee from or elude police when the driver has been signaled by emergency light, hand, voice, or siren to come to a stop or pull over, that individual may be charged with a two-year felony. Essentially, this means you could spend two years in jail. However, depending on the circumstances you could spend up to 15 years in prison.

Michigan Attorney Fighting Fleeing and Eluding Charges

While it may not seem all that serious, fleeing and eluding a police officer is extremely serious. Whether a police officer was attempting to pull you over for speeding, an expired license plate, defective equipment, or a traffic infraction such as failing to stop at a stop sign or red light, it is the law that you obey the police officer's command or request to bring your vehicle to a stop. However, there are various defense strategies that may be effective in preventing a conviction and the resulting criminal penalties. If you have been charged with fleeing and eluding, contact our Michigan criminal defense attorneys immediately.

Penalties for Fleeing and Eluding in Michigan

First-degree. Fleeing and eluding which results in the death of another person will result in criminal penalties which include a fine of up to $5,000, a maximum of 15 years in prison, and revocation of your driver's license.

Second-degree. If another individual is seriously injured or you have been convicted of fleeing and eluding in the past, the penalties for a conviction include a fine of up to $5,000, a maximum of 10 years in prison, and revocation of your driver's license.

Third-degree. If determined that an accident occurred as the result of a police chase, that the chase occurred in part in an area where the speed limit is 35 mph or less, or previous conviction for fleeing and eluding, the penalties for a conviction include a fine of up to $1,000, a maximum of 5 years in prison, and suspension of your driver's license

Fourth-degree. Fleeing and eluding a police officer violates state law. With no other aggravating factors, defendants will face a maximum fine of $500, up to 2 years in prison, and driver's license suspension

The criminal penalties for fleeing and eluding a police officer in Michigan are obviously harsh; however, for many individuals (particularly those charged with fourth-degree fleeing & eluding), having their driver's license suspended is worst of all. Driving is a privilege and not a right, but we all depend on the ability to jump in the car and go whenever and wherever we may please. Having the privilege to drive is critical for employment and school purposes, attending doctor appointments, running errands, and more.

Contact Grabel & Associates Now

Whether your license has been suspended or revoked due to a fleeing and eluding conviction or for some other reason, it is vital to choose an attorney who is skilled in having driver’s licenses restored. At Grabel & Associates, we handle issues regarding suspended and revoked licenses across all 83 counties. Contact us now online or call 1-800-677-9795.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.