Driving Without a License in Michigan

In the state of Michigan, it is against the law to drive or operate a vehicle without a valid driver's license. Stiff penalties will apply for those who do drive either without a license, or with a suspended or revoked license.

Individuals must be licensed in Michigan in order to lawfully operate a motor vehicle. New drivers may wish to obtain a learner's license when they reach the age of 14 years and 9 months. At age 16, individuals may obtain a regular driver's license. Whether or not any person obtains a driver's license depends on whether specific written tests and physical tests involving the driver's skills are passed.

Driving Without a Required Commercial Driver’s License

Additionally, certain individuals require a CDL (commercial driver's license) or chauffer license in order to perform their job duties. This type of license is required of bus and semi-truck drivers, those who drive delivery trucks such as FedEx or UPS, and others who may transport property or passengers. Essentially, every individual must have one or more of these licenses in order to drive on Michigan's public roads, depending on his or her driving needs/type of employment. At Grabel & Associates, we recommend that anyone who is stopped by police and found to be driving without a license contact our DL attorneys immediately.

What Happens if You are Caught Driving Without a License in Michigan?

The answer depends. As Michigan driver's license restoration attorneys, we know the answer depends on the circumstances. If you are pulled over and found to be operating a motor vehicle without a driver's license, you will likely be issued a traffic ticket. However, if your license has been suspended or revoked due to DUI, a drug offense, reckless driving, or for any reason, you may face penalties which include fines and jail time.

It is important to understand what should happen and what actually happens is different in many cases are two different things. First, driving without a license in Michigan is a misdemeanor offense, which may result in penalties that include a $500 fine and up to 93 days in jail. You will also face the administrative costs of getting your driver's license with the Secretary of State.

Actually, what happens in your situation will depend on the judge, where the DWLS (driving while license suspended) occurred such as in what township or city, and whether the attorney is understanding or compassionate regarding your situation. Ultimately, you should make a concerted effort to obtain your driver's license before your case comes to an end, so that you may face a fine and possibly probation rather than jail time. It is always desirable to attempt to right the wrong and do what is expected of you before you are forced to do so by the court.

Hire a Capable and Skilled Michigan Drivers License Reinstatement Lawyer

If you are caught driving without a license due to suspension or revocation, the punishment you will face will be harsh. In most cases, an individual caught driving on a suspended license will have the original term of suspension doubled. Driving is a privilege, not a right. Living a normal life becomes next to impossible when you cannot operate a vehicle because your license has been suspended or revoked.

At Grabel & Associates, we have a stellar reputation for having individuals' licenses restored, a process that is complex and never easy. We urge you to contact our office today so that we can help determine whether you may be eligible for an administrative review or hearing before the DAAD, Michigan's Driver Assessment and Appeal Division. Contact us now by calling 1-800-677-9795.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.