What Restricted Driver's License Use Does Michigan Grant for Suspended License?


If your driver's license has been suspended due to a DUI or drug conviction, traffic violations or for other reasons, you may be curious as to whether you can obtain a restricted license, and how you can use your license (for example, where you are allowed to drive to and from). At Grabel & Associates, our Michigan driver's license attorneys realize that having your license suspended creates a hardship, and that even with a restricted license it isn't easy.

In most cases, when an individual has been convicted of a criminal offense such as OWI (Operating While Intoxicated) and it is a first offense, his or her driver's license will be suspended for a specific time period (such as 30 days) followed by a specific time period in which that individual's license will be restricted. For example, a first offense OWI will result in a restricted license for 150 days following a 30-day suspension. Some offenses leave individuals facing a suspension of 90 days or longer. In cases where the suspension covers a long period of time, many individuals desire to get a restricted license so that they can get to/from work and for other necessary purposes.

Restricted Driver’s License in Michigan

In Michigan, if you want to apply for a restricted license before the suspension period has lapsed so that you can drive during license suspension; the state handles this on a case-by-case basis and determines whether you are eligible in court. Whether you will qualify for a restricted license may depend on a number of factors including the reason for your license suspension, your driving record, and the need for a restricted license such as to get to and from work or school.

What Restricted DL Use Does Michigan Grant for Suspended License?

Individuals whose licenses have been suspended and who have been granted restricted privileges will be limited as to when and where they can drive. Some examples of where you may drive on a restricted license include:

  • To and from work
  • To and from school
  • To and from counseling, rehab, community service or for other court-mandated reasons
  • To and from religious services
  • For medical appointments or a medical emergency situation

When driving on a restricted license, individuals may not drive for reasons that are non-essential such as dining out, going to the movies, or to attend social functions. Driving is strictly limited, sometimes even in regards to days of the week or specific times of day.

Contact an Experienced Michigan Driver’s License Lawyer

At Grabel & Associates, we understand that issues regarding suspended and restricted driver’s licenses can be confusing and complicated. We also understand how essential it is that individuals have the privilege to drive, especially in rural Michigan areas. If you have questions about getting a restricted license before your suspension period ends or need legal guidance, contact us today at 1-800-677-9795. We are available 24/7 to start the process of getting you back on the road.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.