Michigan Point System

In the state of Michigan, some traffic violations are considered misdemeanors or felonies while others are considered civil infractions. For instance, a speeding violation would be considered a civil infraction while a DUI offense would be considered a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the circumstances. The Michigan driver's license attorneys at Grabel & Associates want motorists to be aware of the impact that traffic violations may have on their driving records, and the resulting implications.

There are several things that may happen when an individual commits a traffic violation. Depending on how serious the violation is considered under Michigan law, you may be fined, sentenced to jail, or referred to a special program. If you fail to pay a traffic ticket or go to court to fight the charge, you may find that your driver's license is suspended.

Additionally, every traffic ticket in Michigan has a point value. This value is set in the Michigan Vehicle Code; points are based on the seriousness of the infraction. If you are found responsible for a civil infraction or convicted of a misdemeanor or felony offense, points will be assigned to your driving record, which will remain for two years. It is important that you consult with a Michigan driver's license lawyer who understands how to keep points off of your driver record, as an accumulation of points can result in suspension of your license, payment of a Driver's Responsibility Fee, and even increased auto insurance premiums. Additionally, the Secretary of State may require that you take a driving class.

Traffic Convictions and Points Assigned

Below are a few examples of the points that may be placed on your driver record for various offenses:

Six points

  • Felony offenses which involve a motor vehicle including negligent homicide and manslaughter
  • Operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • Reckless driving
  • Fleeing or eluding police
  • Failure to stop and give ID at the scene of an accident
  • Refusing to take a chemical test

Four points

  • Driving 16 mph or more over legal speed limit
  • Drag racing
  • Any measurable BAC individuals under age 21
  • Operative while visibly impaired

Three points

  • Failing to stop a railroad crossing
  • Driving 11 to 15 mph over speed limit
  • Careless driving
  • Improper passing or disobeying stop sign or traffic signal
  • Disobeying school crossing or failing to stop for school bus

Two points

  • Open alcohol container in vehicle
  • Refusal of PBT (Preliminary Breath Test) by individual under age 21
  • Driving 10 mph or less over legal speed limit
  • All other moving violations of traffic laws

Don't put your driver's license at risk or possibly face other punishment. In some cases it is possible to have points removed from your driver record. We have a proven track record in all areas related to protecting clients’ driving privileges, including restoration of drivers’ licenses that have been suspended or revoked. Contact us online or call Grabel & Associates today at 1-800-677-9795 for a free consultation.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.