Types of Licenses Awarded at DAAD Hearings


If your driver's license has been suspended or revoked due to repeated DUI offenses, a drug conviction or for any other reason, you may be curious about the types of licenses that are typically awarded at a DAAD (Driver Assessment and Appeal Division) hearing. At Grabel & Associates, our Michigan driver's license restoration attorneys have a positive track record for helping our clients have their privilege to drive restored. However, we also pride ourselves on educating individuals whose driver's licenses have been suspended or revoked as much as possible.

Clients often asked if their appeal is won, what type of license will be awarded. You will find a brief answer to this question below, followed by a detailed explanation.

Are You a Michigan Resident Living in the State?

While every individual would love to have a full license, under the law you MUST drive on a restricted license for a minimum of one year, and have an ignition interlock device installed on your vehicle. Following the required time period, you will need to file another appeal in order to drive with the interlock device removed, and obtain a full license.

Are You a Michigan Resident Living in Another State?

If you live in another state but are a resident of Michigan, you must obtain clearance to be licensed in the state in which you live. Individuals who are residents of Michigan and who have had their license revoked due to multiple DUIs win "clearance" which basically removes the Michigan hold on your driving record. Once you have won this appeal, you will be free to obtain your driver's license in another state.

For Michigan Residents, There are Two Types of Licenses

Upon a successful DAAD hearing, individuals are awarded one of two types of licenses - time based, or purpose based. Regardless of which type of license you are awarded, the ignition interlock requirement will be enforced.

What is a purpose-based license? This type of licenses is awarded most often, and allows the individual to drive for specific purposes such as to and from work, school, for employment training or education purposes, to attend counseling or AA meetings, or for medical treatment for yourself only. With this type of license there are no time restrictions, but you can only drive for the specific purposes outlined.

What is a time-based license? While a time based license may sound more attractive, it is actually far more restricting. This type of license restricts the times of day or hours you can drive with no flexibility. For example, you may be allowed to drive between the hours of 6:30 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., but should an emergency arise or you need to work late, there are no exceptions.

In most cases individuals are not given a choice of which type of restricted license they prefer; however if given a choice, most prefer a purpose based license.

Winning a First Appeal Does Not Guarantee Winning a Second Appeal for Full Driving Privileges

It's easy to assume that if you drive on a restricted license and meet all requirements for a minimum of one year, you will be granted a full license at your second appeal - however, this is not always the case. Michigan does not make obtaining a full license easy. You must present information including a "final report" from the ignition interlock device company reviewing how you performed in regards to breath-testing in your vehicle, obtain Letters of Support, and undergo a complete Substance Abuse Evaluation along with a urine test, among other things.

At Grabel & Associates, our Michigan DAAD hearing lawyers are ready to help you win back your driving privileges whether you are in need of a restricted license, or have met the minimum requirements of your restricted license and are ready to pursue a full license. Let us help ensure you win your DAAD hearing; contact us now at 1-800-677-9795 or online.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.