Mandatory Suspension of Driver's License

In the state of Michigan, there are certain factors that may cause a mandatory suspension of your driver's license. Certain violations requires that an individual's driver's license be suspended; some of these violations include drunken or reckless driving, stealing gasoline or motor fuel, or refusal of a breath test when you are stopped for suspicion of drunken driving. At Grabel & Associates, our Michigan driver’s license reinstatement attorneys want you to understand the impact that certain violations may have on your privilege to drive.

Mandatory Suspensions - Secretary of State

The Secretary of State may take action automatically when certain traffic violations are committed, without the permission of the courts. You may be able to obtain a restricted license in some situations by petitioning the Circuit Court; however in some cases if your license is suspended or revoked, you may not be eligible for a hardship appeal. Some of the offenses, which may lead to mandatory suspension by the Secretary of State, include:

  • Reckless driving
  • UDAA (Unlawfully driving away of auto)
  • Open intoxicants in vehicle
  • Fleeing and eluding police
  • Driving while license is suspended
  • Refusal of breath test

Mandatory Suspension - Drunk Driving

Drunk driving offenses subject the individual who is charged and subsequently convicted to mandatory license suspension; the courts have no discretion in imposing these sanctions. Additionally, no hardship appeal is available for these types of offenses, which include:

OWI - Depending on whether it is your first, second, or third offense, your license will be suspended for 30 days followed by 150 days restricted license up to 5 years revoked. A first OWI impaired offense will leave you facing a restricted license for 90 days.

Zero tolerance - First offense us 30 days restricted license. Second offense is 90 days or one year suspension.

Child Endangerment - First offense is 90 days revoked license followed by 90 days restricted license. Second offense is a one year revocation of your driver's license.

CDL license - First offense BAC of .04 or higher, your operator's license will be restricted for 90 days; CDL license is suspended for one year, hazard 3-year suspension. Second offense, operator's license revoked for one year, CDL license revoked for 10 years. A third offense will result in your CDL license being revoked for life.

Many individuals do not realize the seriousness of some criminal offenses and traffic violations. For instance, individuals who are convicted of crimes involving drugs often have their licenses suspended for a certain period of time depending upon the circumstances, prior criminal history, etc. Losing the privilege to drive negatively impacts almost every area of your life.

The action taken by the Secretary of State against your driver's license will depend on several factors including your driving record, the offense or violation you are accused of, and whether you are agreeable with recommendations and requirements assessed in your particular situation. While no one wants to have his or her license suspended, having your license revoked is the most serious action that can be taken by authorities.

Contact an Experienced and Aggressive Michigan Driver's License Lawyer Immediately

Regardless of your situation, our team of skilled and experienced Michigan driver's license attorneys can help. We understand that driving is not a luxury; it is a necessity - and a privilege you cannot afford to be without. We have an outstanding record for success in driver's license hearings across the state of Michigan.

Contact us online today for a free evaluation of your case. We are available 24/7, so call us now at 1-800-677-9795.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.