How Can AA Affect My Michigan Suspended or Revoked Driver's License Case?

At Grabel & Associates, we know that winning your driver's license privilege back after it has been suspended or revoked is a complex and often tedious process. Revocation is particularly serious, even more so than having your license suspended. Can AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) play an important role in the outcome of your Michigan suspended or revoked driver's license case? It can, but first we must discuss how it is essential that you understand the Michigan license restoration process and what must be proven in order for your driver's license to be restored.

Our revoked driver’s license lawyers are renowned across the state of Michigan for the positive results we reach for clients who desire to have their driver's license restored. However, we want you to be aware of what is required; it is not as simple as asking, you must provide solid proof that you have taken steps to overcome your alcohol problem, and that you will not drink again.

Brief Explanation of the Driver's License Restoration Process

You must request a hearing with the DAAD (Driver Assessment and Appeal Division) of the Michigan Secretary of State. This hearing will be similar to a trial in that you will be required to testify, and evidence supporting your sobriety will be submitted. Witnesses may also testify on your behalf, such as family, friends, AA sponsors or others who have close contact with you.

Some of the evidence that will be submitted are letters of reference from family, friends, co-workers, and sobriety sponsors. You will also need to have a substance abuse evaluation performed prior to requesting a hearing. Our Michigan driver's license restoration attorneys will support you through the process and work to ensure that every detail is in order so that you have the best possible chance of getting your license restored.

Alcoholics Anonymous and Driver's License Restoration

It is not imperative that you attend AA, but you must provide undeniable evidence that you no longer consume alcohol, and that you will not fall back on your old habits in the future. Hearing officers may assume that you are an alcoholic, and you must prove by providing clear and convincing evidence that you are not.

Ultimately, it is beneficial when you can provide DAAD hearing officers with proof that you have attended a structured substance abuse program, and that you actively participated in the group and attended weekly, whether this support group is Alcoholics Anonymous or another recognized program.

The results of your substance abuse evaluation can play a critical role in whether you should attend AA. Qualified substance abuse counselors review these evaluations, and determine whether an individual abuses or is dependent on alcohol. Depending on whether you are diagnosed as an abuser or dependent can determine whether it is necessary for you to attend a 12 step program such as Alcoholics Anonymous. If you are diagnosed as alcohol dependent, AA may play a critical role in getting your license restored.

Attending AA can be very beneficial in proving to hearing officers that you are no longer a risk and that you will not consume alcohol, however it is important that you participate in the program fully. Hearing officers want to see that you have attended regularly, and gone through the step work successfully with your sponsor. Simply attending a few meetings is not enough.

Contact Us Today

We understand that the process of having your license restored is not easy, and we are ready to help. Contact Grabel & Associates today at 1-800-677-9795 for unparalleled legal guidance. We will provide you with the support you need to ensure your hearing is a success, so that you can get back on the road and on with life.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.