Basic Driver's Improvement Courses (BDIC) - Reduce Points in Michigan

The Michigan Legislature passed MCL 257.320d which permits eligible drivers to complete a Basic Driver’s Improvement Course (BIDC) to avoid having points go on their license, as well as prevents a notification of the ticket from being sent to the driver’s insurance company. Only drivers who meet the eligibility requirements may take the course. BDIC includes basic skills and defensive driving strategies to improve a driver’s awareness. The BDIC helps driver’s brush up on road signs and proper driving procedures. Each course requires a minimum of four hours of study and costs approximately $100. Let us take a look at the law codifying the BDIC, then talk about the pros and cons of taking the course. Finally, we will look who is eligible to take the course, and the practical steps to successfully complete the course if you chose to.

Therefore, we can see that for eligible drivers this program offers an option to avoid points on their driver’s license, but let’s take a closer look at what actually happens once a person successfully completes a course. s

Why the Basic Driver Improvement Course (BDIC) May Not Be In Your Best Interest?

The BDIC is a great program for having points removed off your license, and if you successfully complete the program, then the Secretary of State will not share the ticket information with your insurance company. However, the Secretary of State will still put the ticket information on your record. The Secretary of State says that this information may still be used “for other purposes.” For example, if a person ever needs to undergo a Driver Assessment reexamination for any reason, then the magistrate will still weigh this ticket into a decision. Additionally, you will have to undergo a course that lasts at least four hours and pay the class fee which is up to $100.

Alternative to BDIC: Schedule a Hearing and Win

The only way to keep this ticket off your record and prevent it from ever being used against you is to schedule a hearing within 10 days and to contest the ticket at a hearing. If you are eligible for the BDIC course then the offense will likely be a speeding ticket or another moving violation. Let our driver’s license lawyers represent you to fight your ticket. We have the experience, knowledge, and integrity necessary to get traffic tickets reduced or dropped. Contesting the ticket and winning is the only way to get the best of all things. If you win, then you won’t have points on your license, you won’t have to take a course or pay a classroom fee, and you won’t have the ticket go on your record that may be used against you in the future.

Who is Eligible for Basic Driver’s Improvement Course (BDIC)?

There are many reasons why a person may be disqualified from taking a BDIC. First, it is only available for civil infractions such as speeding tickets. You cannot take a BDIC to remove points for a criminal offense. Second, the violation must correspond to a maximum of three points on your license, and you may not take a BDIC if you have already previously done so. Additionally, you may not take a BDIC if you have a commercial driver’s license (CDL) even if you were driving a non-commercial vehicle. Next, you will not be eligible if you were cited for two or more moving violations arising out of the same incident. Finally, you will not be eligible to take a BDIC if you already have three or more points on your license.

Therefore, the only people who are eligible are people who have less than three points on your license, were cited for a single moving violation, and do have a CDL. If you are eligible you will receive a notification from the Secretary of State by first-class mail that will include the basic information about taking and completing the course. If you do not receive a notice by mail you may need to update your last known address. If you are eligible and do not receive a notice, then you still can sign up and take a course within the 60 day widow to take advantage of the program and avoid having points on your license. However, as was previously mentioned if you are eligible, the ticket will stay on your record even though the points do not. Consequently, if you want to keep your record clean it may be in your best interest to schedule a formal hearing and fight the ticket.

When, Where, and With Who Do I Take a Basic Driver Improvement Course?

You must enroll and complete the course within 60 days of receiving the moving violation ticket. According to the Secretary of State, The Michigan Department of State approves qualified sponsors to host and teach defensive driving curriculums that meet or exceed the standards set by Michigan Law. The BDIC is available to eligible drivers in either online or in-classroom formats. There are advantages and disadvantages to each format. The online class you can complete from the comfort of your own home, but most include more quizzes after each section. Whereas, you have to go to a class room and listen to lectures for the in-class option, but there will likely be less quizzes. However, both the online option and the in-class option will have a final exam covering all of the material presented. It is necessary to pass the final exam before the sponsor will issue a certificate of completion to the Secretary of State. The course sponsor will electronically notify the Secretary of State that you have passed the course, and they will not add any points to your license from the ticket. Here is a list of approved online sponsors. Following is a list of approved in-person classroom sponsors.

Under MCL 257.320d(7), the price an approved sponsor may charge a person for a basic driver improvement course may not be more than $100, so no matter which sponsor you choose to sign up with, the price should not exceed $100.

The Michigan Driver’s license attorneys at Grabel & Associates are here to answer any questions you may have related to a BDIC or your driver’s license. Call us today at 1-800-677-9795 or contact us online for any question or concerns you may have.

Please note: Recently Administrative Hearings Section (AHS) changed their name to the Office of Hearings and Administrative Oversight. Common use of the name Office of Hearings and Administrative Oversight has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver's license hearings is still referred to as AHS in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term "AHS" throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State's website here.

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